Welcome to North Country Community Health Services Agency!

The North Country Community Health Board is a legal governing authority for local public health in Hubbard, Clearwater, and Lake of the Woods counties in Minnesota, and NCCHB works with Minnesota Department of Health in partnership to prevent diseases, protect against environmental hazards, promote healthy behaviors and healthy communities, respond to disasters, ensure access to health services, and assure an adequate local public health infrastructure. The NCCHB administers the Public Health programming according to MN statute 145A.

CDC Vital Signs™ – Learn about the latest public health data. Read CDC Vital Signs™…

 

Community Resource Connections (CRC) are certified by the State of Minnesota to provide MNsure assistance. The Mission of the CRC is to improve access to and the effectiveness of community services through collaboration, coordination, and integration.  The CRC has compiled a searchable database of providers in the region, to search this database and be connected with service providers click here.

 

HOT TOPICS:

Tick Borne Diseases

The main tick hazards in Minnesota are diseases, such as Lyme disease or human anaplasmosis.  These tick borne diseases are bacterial and are transmitted from infected blacklegged (deer) ticks.  Lyme disease and human anaplasmosis can be treated with antibiotics, but if left untreated, they can be serious.  For further information, go to cdc.gov/lyme

The following is information from the Centers for Disease Control regarding tickborne illness.

Tickborne diseases are on the rise and prevention should be on everyone’s mind, particularly during the spring, summer, and early-fall when ticks are most active. From May through July, people will get more tick bites and tickborne diseases than any other time of year in the United States. It’s especially important to take steps to protect yourself and your loved ones (including pets) from ticks during this season, as well as any time during warmer months when you’re outside.
Many people do not know they are at risk. Each year, more than 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported nationwide, while studies suggest the actual number of people diagnosed with Lyme disease is more likely about 300,000. Despite these numbers, a recent national survey reported that nearly 20 percent of people surveyed in areas where Lyme disease is common were unaware that it was a risk. Additionally, half of people interviewed in another study reported that they did not routinely take steps to protect themselves against tick bites during warm weather.

No sure way to predict how bad a season will be

Preventing Lyme and other tickborne diseases is important every year. Predicting the number of Lyme disease or other tickborne infections, and how an upcoming season will compare to previous years, is complicated. Ticks that spread disease to people can have up to 2 to 3-year lifecycles, and many factors can affect their numbers, including temperature, rainfall, humidity, and the amount of available hosts for the ticks to feed on, such as mice, deer and other animals. In any given year, the number of ticks in an area will be different from region to region, state to state, and even county to county.

Know the risk

What is known is that regardless of the number of ticks this year, people should be aware that ticks could be in the areas where they live, work and play. Everyone should take steps to help protect themselves and their loved ones, including pets, While not all ticks carry the same diseases, ticks can be found in every state. Throughout the continental United States, some diseases occur more frequently in some areas than others:

  • Lyme disease(https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/index.html) risk is focused in the Northeast, mid-Atlantic, and upper Midwest, with pockets of lower risk along the west coast. However, the range of the tick that transmits Lyme disease also is expanding. While nearly 95 percent of Lyme disease cases occur in 14 states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin, infected ticks can also be found in neighboring states and in some areas of Northern California, Oregon and Washington.

  • Other less known, but serious tickborne diseases include Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, Powassan virus, and babesiosis. These diseases tend to be concentrated in specific parts of the country. Babesiosis and anaplasmosis occur in the same areas as Lyme disease—mainly in the Northeast and upper Midwest. More than 60 percent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever cases occur in five states: Arkansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.

    Take steps to protect against ticks

    Taking steps to protect yourself and your family from getting a tick bite is the best defense against Lyme disease and other tickborne infections. Whether you’re working, enjoying your yard, camping, hiking, hunting or otherwise in the outdoors, CDC recommends that people:

  • Avoid areas with high grass and leaf litter and walk in the center of trails when hiking.

  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. EPA’s helpful search tool can help you find the product that best suits your needs. Always follow product instructions.

  • Use products that contain permethrin to treat clothing and gear, such as boots, pants, socks and tents or look for clothing pre-treated with permethrin.

  • Treat dogs for ticks. Dogs are very susceptible to tick bites and to some tickborne diseases. They may also bring ticks into your home. Talk to your veterinarian about the best tick prevention products for your dog.

  • Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors to wash off and more easily find crawling ticks before they bite you.

  • Conduct a full-body tick check using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body upon returning from tick-infested areas. Parents should help children check thoroughly for ticks. Remove any ticks right away.

  • Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed.

Send Your Children Back to School Protected from Serious Diseases

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder we all need vaccines throughout our lives.

Back-to-school season is here. It’s time for parents to gather school supplies and backpacks. It’s also the perfect time to make sure your children are up to date on their vaccines.

Getting children all of the vaccines recommended by CDC’s immunization schedule is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their children from serious diseases. If you haven’t done so already, now is the time to check with your child’s doctor to find out what vaccines your child needs.

Vaccines protect children, preteens and teens from 16 serious and potentially life-threatening diseases.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk for diseases and can also spread diseases to others in their classrooms and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer or other health conditions.

Talk to your child’s doctor to find out which vaccines are recommended for them before going back to school.

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2018 North Country Community Health Board

Clearwater County

  • Mary Tronerud - 6th Term
  • John Nelson - 6th Term

Hubbard County

  • Cal Johannsen - 4th Term
  • Deb Vizecky - 1st Term

Lake of the Woods County

  • Ken Moorman - 5th Term
  • Tom Mio - 1st Term

2018 North Country CHS Advisory Committee

Clearwater County

  • Bonnie Engen - 1st Term
  • John Nelson - 7th Term

Hubbard County

  • Helene Kahlstorf - 8th Term
  • Deb Vizecky - 1st Term

Lake of the Woods County

  • Ken Moorman - 6th Term
  • Tom Mio - 1st Term

Public Health

10 Essential Services of Local Public Health

#1 Monitor health status to identify community health problems.

#2 Diagnose and investigate health problems and health hazards in the community.

#3 Inform, educate, and empower people about health issues.
#4 Mobilize community partnerships to identify and solve health problems.

#5 Develop policies and plans that support individual and community health efforts.

#6 Enforce laws and regulations that protect health and ensure safety.

#7 Link people to needed personal health services and assure the provision of health
care when otherwise unavailable.

#8 Assure a competent public health and personal health care workforce.

#9 Evaluate effectiveness, accessibility, and quality of personal and population-based
health services.

#10 Research for new insights and innovative solutions to health problems.

 

Minnesota Public Health